… Writing & Technology

In a past life, I had a job as a Credit Analytics consultant with Ernst & Young. I whipped up more than my fair share of spreadsheets and coded up a few SAS analyses here and there for the banks I worked with. However, the most important part of my work was the documents I wrote. Distilled into one sentence, my job as a consultant was to synthesize analytical work into model validation reports and model methodology documentation. At one bank I wrote over 500 pages of text, and over my more than two years with EY I produced more than 1,000 pages of analytical documentation.

However, my true love for writing and a passion for technology both blossomed while I was a Volunteer in the Peace Corps.

Writing seems like something that naturally goes with Peace Corps service. Volunteers have tons of meaningful experiences and tons of time for reflection. That lends itself to writing. I did plenty of writing, mostly on my two blogs, both of which I continue writing on to this day. However, technology is more of a non-sequitur with Peace Corps service. I did not have much access to technology, so how did I become so interested in it?

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Me being Nicaraguan

Along with time to write, Peace Corps service gave me a lot of time to read. I had to tell my mom to stop sending me links to articles. I had inevitably already read them. I read most of the NY Times on a daily basis, and my parents got me a digital subscription to The Economist. I also devoured much of Wired, and whatever else popped up around the internet and on my Facebook feed.

Digesting all of this information led me to realize that technology could go a long way to solve many of the problems that Nicaragua and other lesser-developed countries around the world face. Even more so than ‘technology,’ which is a word typically associated with something tangible or engineered, there is a thirst for innovation in lesser-developed countries. New ideas, new ways of doing things, and connecting disparate ideas to come up with novel solutions to problems can all be used to solve the problems of international development. Even a staid and old idea in one culture might be embraced as new and promising in another.

When I completed my Peace Corps service I entered business school intent on learning about global business, operations management, entrepreneurship, and technology and innovation.

Midway through business school, during the height of my summer internship with UPS, I felt confident that I had the skills to try to tackle some of the problems I encountered in Nicaragua. I founded a startup in July 2017 called ChickenBus. It is a socially minded tech startup dedicated to improving access to public transportation in lesser developed countries. The MVP is under development, and I hope to ship in Q1 2018.

Read the continuation here on my other blog, Incidents of Travel

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Posted on December 1, 2017, in Business Models, Development, Innovation and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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